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humidifier water
#11
Distilled water is probably best. However, you can use tap water. It will scale up the tank; and the more minerals the worse it will get.
Cleaning the tank with 5% white vinegar helps dissolve build up. If you can get new tank every 6 months or so from insurance, then in most cases of tap water use things go OK. One note, hard water in the humidifier chamber does not translate to minerals entering the air stream or lungs. The evaporated water entering the air stream leaves the minerals behind -- that's why the tank gets deposits; plus, the evaporation process is like a slow rate distillery.
(No folks, you cannot make booze with it.)
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#12
(03-08-2014, 12:37 PM)justMongo Wrote: Distilled water is probably best.
Yes, also recommended that you dump the water, wash and dry the tank after each use. all the other stuff need to be cleaned thoroughly so they don,t become breeding grounds for germs and inspect/change the filter regularly



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#13
I use distilled water, the cheaper the better. If I run out, I'll use water from the hot tap, before it runs too hot. That way it's at least been sterilized in the water heater. When I clean the chamber, I use white vinegar, and usually let it soak a while to remove any calcium and sterilize it.
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#14
One thing that I thought I would mention here. If you use water that has not had the minerals removed, it is a good idea to dump any water remaining in the tank in the morning. If you do not, minerals will become more concentrated in the tank and cause more scale to build up. One does not need to worry about breathing the minerals in the water because they will not leave the tank.

Best Regards,

PaytonA
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#15
Distilled water = best option IMO. It will probably cost you more in gas to heat the water than it does to just buy distilled water.

I've had plently of patients with high end reverse osmosis systems do perfectly fine with water from the tap.
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#16
jaycee,

All of that is very good but we have people on this forum who do not have access to distilled water. It may be the best option but it is not the only option.

Reverse osmosis removes minerals and some organics but does not disinfect. So if the feed water or the product water for RO is disinfected then you have "perfectly clean" water. The actual fact of the matter is that bacteria will not enter the airstream from the water in the tank but I feel better not letting bacteria accumulate in my humidifier tank.

There a number of threads on the forum discussing the type of water for use in the humidifier. There is also a Wiki that discusses this same question.

Best Regards,

PaytonA
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#17
(05-23-2014, 09:52 AM)d1hartman Wrote: I use distilled water, the cheaper the better. If I run out, I'll use water from the hot tap, before it runs too hot. That way it's at least been sterilized in the water heater. When I clean the chamber, I use white vinegar, and usually let it soak a while to remove any calcium and sterilize it.

Unless your water heater is set to boiling point, the water in the heater is not sterile. Not even close to sterile. The pipes from the water tank are not, even if the water is sitting there boiling for 24/7.

Vinegar won't sterilize the water chamber. A 10% bleach solution will, however. Or Control III solution.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#18
I use tap water. Have for years. Ain't dead yet. Lungs are clear. Don't have chronic nasal issues. My asthma has not gotten worse. My allergies have not gotten worse. My humidifier actually helps me during allergy season.

If the water is safe enough to drink, you can use it in your humidifier.
If the water is not so "hard" that it leaves brown stains in the sink, tub, and toilet, you can use it in your humidifier.
If the water does not stink from being "hard", you can use it in your humidifier.

Distilled water is not necessarily sterile. Unless they sterilize the jug. Unless you open it in a sterile environment. Unless you sterilize your tubing, mask, and humidifier tub, and the room you sleep in is sterile, the water making its way to your lungs is not sterile.

Very few microbes, germs, and molds can ride along the droplets of water from the humidifier tank all the way up the tube and into your sinus cavity.

Using tap water could result in more reason to clean. There may be mineral scale deposits that need regular light scrubbing and/or vinegar solution soaking. Some humidifier tubs, such as the non-dishwasher safe H5i tub, seems to hold onto the mineral scale harder (I think it is because it is aluminum or cheaper aluminum).

There. My opinion. That and $4 will get you a decaf mocha.
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#19
(05-23-2014, 07:53 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote:
(05-23-2014, 09:52 AM)d1hartman Wrote: I use distilled water, the cheaper the better. If I run out, I'll use water from the hot tap, before it runs too hot. That way it's at least been sterilized in the water heater. When I clean the chamber, I use white vinegar, and usually let it soak a while to remove any calcium and sterilize it.

Unless your water heater is set to boiling point, the water in the heater is not sterile. Not even close to sterile. The pipes from the water tank are not, even if the water is sitting there boiling for 24/7.

Vinegar won't sterilize the water chamber. A 10% bleach solution will, however. Or Control III solution.

The hot water tank can add minerals to the water, often harmful minerals, that you really shouldn't consume. Use fresh cold water when you cook, drink or humidify, and nice hot water when you take a bath.

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#20
They recommend instilled water but that's only to cut down on the scale build up in the pan. U can use anything and just wash out and dry the chamber every day.
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