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metformin
#21
I get that exercise is very important, however, so is the food that we eat. If we eat a lot of carbs, blood sugar rises and if it rises enough, a person can become diabetic.

What I wonder is, were any of you able to control your blood sugar with changes in diet (as well as exercise) without the aid of medication of any type.

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#22
If you can follow the Atkins Diet (and I mean the whole thing, not the first 2 weeks), you can control your blood sugar quite well. Dr Atkins designed the diet originally for diabetics who were having serious control problems. My BIL has excellent control on his gluten free diet, but he also says that it could just be because his overall carb consumption is down. He was never overweight.

In my case, I thought I was doing well, but steroid use for eczema finally required meds. I knew a lot of people at Weight Watchers who were able to drop their meds entirely after losing weight.

Personally, I dropped from taking 2,000 mg to 1,000 mg. of metformin. As long as I have edema, I'll be on metformin. My knees improved incredibly when I first started on metformin and when I stopped for 6 months, I could no longer get up off the floor despite continued good control with diet. Back on metformin and they were fine again.
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#23
(06-14-2015, 08:19 AM)Mosquitobait Wrote: ...As long as I have edema, I'll be on metformin. My knees improved incredibly when I first started on metformin and when I stopped for 6 months, I could no longer get up off the floor despite continued good control with diet. Back on metformin and they were fine again.

This does not make medical sense to me.
This Veteran is medicated for your protection.
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#24
I've been on Metformin since my diagnosis as a PWD (person with diabetes) in 2003. At first I had a very difficult time getting used to the 'regular' version of Metformin and then my Endocrinologist switched me to Metformin ER, which is an extended release version. It wasn't a miracle cure for the side effects, but it was easier to tolerate. Even though I am Type 1 and obviously use insulin, I take Metformin ER 500 mg 3 times a day with meals for insulin resistance. I've have found that for me, my blood sugars are much easier to control when I avoid things that are "white" like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. That isn't to say I never eat those foods, but when I do, I always measure or weigh them and try to use portion control.
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#25
(06-16-2015, 09:29 AM)GrammaBear Wrote: I've been on Metformin since my diagnosis as a PWD (person with diabetes) in 2003. At first I had a very difficult time getting used to the 'regular' version of Metformin and then my Endocrinologist switched me to Metformin ER, which is an extended release version. It wasn't a miracle cure for the side effects, but it was easier to tolerate. Even though I am Type 1 and obviously use insulin, I take Metformin ER 500 mg 3 times a day with meals for insulin resistance. I've have found that for me, my blood sugars are much easier to control when I avoid things that are "white" like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. That isn't to say I never eat those foods, but when I do, I always measure or weigh them and try to use portion control.

I was told that IF one is eating a carb like potatoes or sweet potatoes, no matter how small, to pair it with a protein
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#26
(06-16-2015, 02:02 PM)me50 Wrote:
(06-16-2015, 09:29 AM)GrammaBear Wrote: I've been on Metformin since my diagnosis as a PWD (person with diabetes) in 2003. At first I had a very difficult time getting used to the 'regular' version of Metformin and then my Endocrinologist switched me to Metformin ER, which is an extended release version. It wasn't a miracle cure for the side effects, but it was easier to tolerate. Even though I am Type 1 and obviously use insulin, I take Metformin ER 500 mg 3 times a day with meals for insulin resistance. I've have found that for me, my blood sugars are much easier to control when I avoid things that are "white" like bread, pasta, rice and potatoes. That isn't to say I never eat those foods, but when I do, I always measure or weigh them and try to use portion control.

I was told that IF one is eating a carb like potatoes or sweet potatoes, no matter how small, to pair it with a protein

Interesting, as I've never heard that. I wonder if it might be that some protein also has some fat? Fat slows down the after meal spike. Or at least it does for me.

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#27
Protein slows the digestion of carbohydrates and the production of glucose, which can help to stabilize blood sugar levels. The faster your body can digest simple carbohydrates, the faster and higher your blood sugar levels rise. Both protein and fat slow the absorption of carbohydrates; eating a combination of fat, protein and carbohydrates at every meal helps regulate glucose and insulin levels in your body.


Carbohydrates and Glucose

Glucose is your body's primary energy source and is easily made from simple carbohydrates. Simple carbs are those with one or two sugars; complex carbohydrates have three or more sugars. Table sugar, maple syrup and honey are simple carbs, as is fructose, which occurs naturally in fruits, and lactose, a sugar in milk products. Simple carbs digest quickly -- usually in 15 to 30 minutes -- and have an immediate impact on blood sugar levels. Complex carbs such as fiber take more time to digest and have less of an affect on glucose production.

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=ch...with+carbs

As always, do your research. I cannot guarantee what is written on the internet is accurate. Although my doctor said that it is beneficial to pair carbs with protein. I also read that adding fiber is beneficial too. (please do your research on this to confirm). I make no guarantees of the accuracy of this information. You decide :-)
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#28
(06-14-2015, 08:35 AM)justMongo Wrote:
(06-14-2015, 08:19 AM)Mosquitobait Wrote: ...As long as I have edema, I'll be on metformin. My knees improved incredibly when I first started on metformin and when I stopped for 6 months, I could no longer get up off the floor despite continued good control with diet. Back on metformin and they were fine again.

This does not make medical sense to me.

I don't get it either, but given that they've changed the explanation about how metformin works, I expect they don't know it all. I've done the 6 month break twice with the same results, so it's definitely something with the metformin. It will be interesting to see if it continues after this year's weight loss goal is achieved, although my doc isn't going to take me off unless A1C is 5.5 or less.

I agree about the carbs and protein but many things are dependent on the person themselves. My numbers go up a lot no matter how much rice I have, but not if I have a large baked potato. I use the glycemic index as a sort of guideline, but also burned through a lot of strips testing regular meals and specific foods. Atkins works well for me, but I get a lot of negative family flack when I try to follow it. I don't understand their angst about it. What's wrong with meat/poultry/fish and vegetables with a little dairy?
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#29
That is enough to get my attention!

Actor and Comedian Rick Ducommun Dies at Age 62
TORONTO — Jun 18, 2015, 5:56 PM ET
By CHARMAINE NORONHA Associated Press
Associated Press
Actor and comedian Rick Ducommun, known for his role in the 1989 film "The 'Burbs," has died at age 62, his family said Thursday.

Peter Ducommun said his brother died on June 12 at a Vancouver, British Columbia, hospital after suffering from complications due to diabetes.
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#30
http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-suppleme...b-20060400
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