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persistent odor problem
#11
I actually experienced the 'detergent residue' issue before also. Totally different smell, also left me feeling all dried out inside. I use very little now, and more importantly, I rinse very thoroughly with filtered water afterwards. I also found that having droplets in the hose of my tap water unfiltered made me feel a bit ill by the next morning. It's city water and probably chock full of chlorine and chloramine and who knows what else. Adding an under sink water filter solved that.

I don't have a dog these days. I do agree the cause is likely external/environmental (though I think the design issues I mentioned of the Airsense 10 exacerbate things a little). Right now I'm thinking get a different night stand, maybe shampoo the carpets. Also there is no UV sterilizer lamp in my HVAC unit.

I will try your suggestions with the hose, though I did something sort of similar once in that I washed a single component of the cpap at a time until the smell went away, and the hose was what did it.
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#12
(09-17-2016, 10:22 PM)PaytonA Wrote: Any normal compression/expansion type air conditioner will remove moisture from the air along with reducing air temperature.

If it's sized correctly and it's in good working order, it will. The OP and I live in climates where central air conditioning is almost a necessity. Many houses have under-sized or worn out units that don't remove enough moisture from the air. This can create a condition known as a "sick house". For example, many so-called high efficiency units installed in the 1990's are notorious for this problem.

Sling psychrometers measure the relative humidity, which is what you want to measure. During air conditioning season in humid climates like they have in the OP's Florida or here on the Texas Gulf Coast, it should never remain above 60% for extended periods of time. Keeping it under 55% is both advisable and comfortable.
Sleepster
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#13
@PaytonA - I used to use a heated hose, but stopped. I don't really care for warm air. I have a 'hose snuggie' I put on in the winter sometimes.

@Sleepster - I looked at Sling psychrometers on Amazon, looks like one will cost me nearly as much as a visit from an AC repair tech, but I'd rather have the tool. Unless you know of a good cheap one?

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#14
FrizzleFry.
Two things that come to mind are acid reflux and/or medications. The reflux is self-explanatory. Some medications can affect our taste and smell senses. . . Right off hand the drug Adipex (Generic-Phentermine) come to mind. This is a weight loss drug that will do a number on both of those senses.
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#15
(09-18-2016, 09:30 PM)Sleepster Wrote:
(09-17-2016, 10:22 PM)PaytonA Wrote: Any normal compression/expansion type air conditioner will remove moisture from the air along with reducing air temperature.

If it's sized correctly and it's in good working order, it will.

Nope it depends more on the temperature and relative humidity. If it accomplishes cooling it will have some condensation. That is removal of moisture from the air. Of course, sometimes this does not happen in desert climates.

Best Regards,

PaytonA
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#16
(09-18-2016, 11:48 PM)PaytonA Wrote: Nope it depends more on the temperature and relative humidity. If it accomplishes cooling it will have some condensation. That is removal of moisture from the air. Of course, sometimes this does not happen in desert climates.

I don't know about desert climates but I know for sure that in the oppressive humid summer climate in the OP's Florida and here where I am, many houses have central air conditioners that cool the air but don't remove enough humidity. I can smell it when I walk in and I can confirm it with a psychrometer. The humidity is well above 60%. It causes odors, makes some people sick, and makes a lot of people like me very uncomfortable.

Commercial establishments such as shopping malls with their chilled water systems can be even worse, and often are.
Sleepster
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#17
(09-21-2016, 07:52 PM)Sleepster Wrote:
(09-18-2016, 11:48 PM)PaytonA Wrote: Nope it depends more on the temperature and relative humidity. If it accomplishes cooling it will have some condensation. That is removal of moisture from the air. Of course, sometimes this does not happen in desert climates.

I don't know about desert climates but I know for sure that in the oppressive humid summer climate in the OP's Florida and here where I am, many houses have central air conditioners that cool the air but don't remove enough humidity. I can smell it when I walk in and I can confirm it with a psychrometer. The humidity is well above 60%. It causes odors, makes some people sick, and makes a lot of people like me very uncomfortable.

Commercial establishments such as shopping malls with their chilled water systems can be even worse, and often are.

I agree with what you are saying here, but what you said at first was that there were many air conditioners that do not remove humidity. When you say *enough* humidity I can agree with you.

I have lived in both desert climates and climates so humid that moisture actually condenses on the leaves of trees and makes you think it is raining. I have also been in commercial establishments where the air was nice and cool and just walking through, I was sweating.

Best Regards,

PaytonA
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#18
(09-21-2016, 09:05 PM)PaytonA Wrote: I agree with what you are saying here, but what you said at first was that there were many air conditioners that do not remove humidity. When you say *enough* humidity I can agree with you.

Ahhh... Yes of course. That's a valid point. I should be more careful about how I phrase that.

Anyway, I find it hard to believe that this could cause a CPAP machine to stink, but since it's happened to three different machines it's the only thing I can think of that might be doing it. It's certainly worth a check.



Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#19
the kind of odour could help you solve the problem , i have no problem but i wash all, humidifier, tube, mask, with hot water and dishwashing liquid, soak in water and bleach for an hour then rinse with distilled water and dry with a laundry clean towel, all this once a week, replace filter once a month and strictly distilled water in the humidifier and have never had odor problems, but i don't live in the states but an island in the mediterranean. my house is made of brick, the floors are of cotto, no carpets or wood or plaster the inside rooms are divided by brick walls so there is not much dust nor humidity which at worst is about 65% and usually about 40% most days. i do get a dry nose though.. a last thought have you had your nose and sinuses checked for infection? let us know what you find. i have no air conditioning in my bedroom as it is cool enough even in summer
ciao
frank, sardinia
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#20
How long has it been going on?

I experienced something similar for the first time ever 2 weeks ago. I couldn't reproduce it, although I tried. Then the other day it happened to a lesser extent.

The mineral deposits in the humidifier turned dark like I had never seen before. That was what appeared to be different that I can recall, other than the odor.

So I am cleaning the humidifier in soapy water, rather than just letting it dry out like I had done for years.



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