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questions about a generator
#1
Good morning fellow board members, 

I was thinking about getting a generator to run my apap because I have frequent power outages. (One lasted 2 days - weather related) I have a ResMed Airsense 10.

So my questions are:
Have any of you run your cpap with a generator?
Which type would you recommend?
Are they loud so my condo neighbor would hear it running?
How many nights could I use it?

I've never used one - never seen one, so any information you offer will not be too elementary. 

Thanks in advance,
Sleepytimegal
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#2
I have some similar questions, as I dry camp for a few weeks in the summer.

With that said, I do have some experience with generators (for charging the battery in my travel-trailer).

The Honda and Yamaha portables are quiet compared to the older generators ... it comes with a price, though, as the Honda 1.5 kW unit (smallest generator) was about $1200. I suspect the Yamahas are a bit cheaper, but I don't know.

Your neighbors would probably hear it, but the noise isn't too bad. Also depends on how far they would be from the generator, when you get about 50 feet away they aren't really all that noticeable.

You might be able to get away with an inverter that you hook up to your car ... hook it up, start the car, and you will have alternating current. If I recall correctly a reasonably high quality unit, capable of 3 kW, can be had for $300 or $400.

-Dave
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#3
We've pretty well beat the topic of various battery backup solutions to death in various threads.
So, use the search function to find those threads.

Generators come in two types. Some that produce 120VAC directly; and some that produce a lower Voltage, such as 12 V, that is kicked up to 120 VAC by a solid state inverter. These latter units make better sense for running a CPAP as the 12 V can be used directly. The Honda GXH50 costs about $1000 and can produce 12 VDC and 120 VAC. Just Google "Honda Generators". Cannot post the link as they (Honda) sell online. You can see their full line which runs from about $1k to over $4k.

For the ResMed, you will need their 12V power converter.

I would be inclined to marry the battery solution with the generator; and only operate the generator to charge a 12 Volt SLA/AGM battery.

Caution should be observed with generators to make sure they are not operated where exhaust can enter a dwelling. They do produce carbon monoxide.
And, never run one indoors.
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#4
(03-30-2017, 08:53 AM)dosco Wrote: I have some similar questions, as I dry camp for a few weeks in the summer.

With that said, I do have some experience with generators (for charging the battery in my travel-trailer).

The Honda and Yamaha portables are quiet compared to the older generators ... it comes with a price, though, as the Honda 1.5 kW unit (smallest generator) was about $1200. I suspect the Yamahas are a bit cheaper, but I don't know.

Your neighbors would probably hear it, but the noise isn't too bad. Also depends on how far they would be from the generator, when you get about 50 feet away they aren't really all that noticeable.

You might be able to get away with an inverter that you hook up to your car ... hook it up, start the car, and you will have alternating current. If I recall correctly a reasonably high quality unit, capable of 3 kW, can be had for $300 or $400.

-Dave

"You might be able to get away with an inverter that you hook up to your car ... hook it up, start the car, and you will have alternating current. If I recall correctly a reasonably high quality unit, capable of 3 kW, can be had for $300 or $400."

That is confusing to me, Dave. You mean I would have to have a cord going all the way from my car to my bedroom? Wouldn't my garage be filled up with carbon monoxide if it ran all night in closed quarter. Unless I'm interpreting it wrong, that wouldn't work. Maybe for camping it would. 
Maybe I'll Google the Honda 1.5 kW unit and see what it says.
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#5
Just Mongo, That was very helpful indeed. I knew nothing about generators and thought I could have a small one in my bedroom. 

Sleepytime gal
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#6
I would highly recommend you read this thread over at another forum for a detailed response by a member there.  Edit.  It appears I cannot post the link here.  Please PM me if you would like the link to go directly to the article.


There have also been quite a few good threads on this forum about this topic and other solutions found by members.  I would NOT recommend using your car battery.

You need to purchase an AGM type preferably but definitely a Deep Cycle variety battery around 35ah minimum with a good quality battery charger.  Along with the Resmed 12V adapter recommended for your machine.
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#7
(03-30-2017, 10:24 AM)sleepytimegal Wrote: Just Mongo, That was very helpful indeed. I knew nothing about generators and thought I could have a small one in my bedroom. 

Sleepytime gal

No, no you can't put on in the bedroom.  Unless you like sleeping.  Permanently.  In a tight box.  

CO kills.

You're far better off with a battery solution.  Not a fancy battery pack made by or for CPAP suppliers.  They cost too much and provide too little functionality and flexibility.  A simple 35 AH 12 V battery would probably get you a couple of days (but you might have to forgo heated humidification).  Pair that with a Deltran Battery Tender for recharging and a manufacturer's car converter cable, a cigar socket with alligator clamps to plug into, and you can make do.  It's kinda what I did for several years.  Power goes out, and I'd pull the battery out of the closet, unhook the humidifier, hook the battery up  to the machine and go back to sleep. 

There are more elegant solutions that are variants to this setup.  Mine has a battery on one side, a ham radio power supply plugged into the wall on the other and the machine gets hooked to that.  That way, the battery stays charged all the time without me doing anything, and if power drops during the night, I never know it because the Powergate immediately switches to battery power. I keep two extra batteries in the closet to rotate through or use in the house to run radios, charge phones or burn a couple of LED lamps..  Each of those batteries should conservatively last me an average of 4-5 nights without further recharge for CPAP use.  So I should have a two week reserve at any given time.  I have a 140W solar panel to recharge the batteries in between use, so I should be able to go indefinitely.  This setup also provides me power to run radios and a couple of LED lamps.

Bigger batteries can run longer, but the 35 AH units appear to be the sweet sport because they have enough capacity to accomplish things, but they are light enough to move around as needed at 11KG/24 pounds.

You will find far more than you ever wanted to know if you search the forum as Mongo says.

OMMOHY
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#8
Oh, and do not try to get a battery and then hook up a 120V inverter to it and plug your machine into the inverter. 

Ghastly inefficient.  You take 12V power, but a portion of it to converti it to 120V, then the machines power brick turns it back into 12V (ok 24 V for the Resmed folk.)

RVLIII
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#9
I echo what others have said, and that is that you look at a sealed lead acid AGM battery solution (AGM = absorbed glass mat). This is the kind of battery that is used in electric powered wheelchairs, emergency power lights, and other indoor applications where a traditional lead acid battery that emits noxious vapors would be inappropriate.

See the backup battery power postings on this board for info on creating your own battery solution. If you are someone or know someone who is handy with tools you can make your own backup power box. I created one using a $15 "field box" available at outdoor and camping stores. Inside the box is a 55aH (amp-hour) SLA AGM battery that will give me 4-5 nights before needing a charge (Resmed S9 on auto with EPR on, no humidifier, regular hose), and I installed a voltmeter and ammeter along with a vehicle power socket and a socket suitable for charging a cell phone, all purchased online. But, at a minimum you only need the battery, Resmed's DC to DC power adaptor for your CPAP, a battery charger, and wiring to hook it together. The rest amounts to bells and whistles. My box cost about $130-$140 altogether. The charger and Resmed's proprietary DC adaptor together will run about the same amount, maybe a tad more. This is not only a much cheaper solution than a generator, it is safe to use and store in the home. The main downside is the weight at 40 pounds.
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#10
I would also go with the battery solution. Get the DC Converter 24V 90W For AirSense™ 10 and a deep cycle battery (marine battery) and you should be set for power outs. If you turn off the humidifier, you should be good for up to 3 nights.
Sound is really poor on this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq4zsXi1In0

The generator would be a necessary thing if you had oxygen and a power out. If you decide to go the generator route, contact your electric company. They may have requirements that must be met.
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