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reading material
#1
Hello everyone I have been on bipap treatment for about 6 months. I was on cpap for about a year. I was not treated properly the first time. The second time it's a little better but from what I remember at the study the tech didn't feel it was perfect really. I was wondering if there are any books for online reading material to help me understand every facet of my treatment. I was thinking about getting something for oximitrey to see what my o2 levels are at night. I know there are many factor regarding fatigue so I plan on seeing my doc again and seeing if my thyroid is correct and make sure all of my medical stuff is perfect. I am 26 280lbs 5 11 and I have been over the years feeling my age. Which sucks cause I'm not old. So i figure since I have a hard time with things I need to be more active I'm my treatment and understand more of how therapy works. I would a precise it. Thanks.
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#2
I don't know of any reading material like you are asking about. You can't get better information than you get here but you would need to ask questions or read the past posts on here or both. There are specific wiki posts for specific subjects here too.

What is it that you are wondering about right now?
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#3
Well the information I'm interested in is basically how ipap and epap affect treatment how each setting on a machine can affect treatment. I'm interested in learning how everything works in something that I can just sit down and read. Learn how to figure what min vent should be or average flow rates should be and all of that. I would like to know because my machine records data and by that data I'm fine but by my sleep report it doesn't look so good from the lab so I want to know why that is and should I worry about it. I'm just tired of being old at 26 I can't do a lot of the things people my age do. I do have a very physically demanding job that is long hours but I do that work outside and can't lose weight to get any better. So I figure if I learn more I can ask more informed questions because right now I'm not sure what to ask.
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#4
If you have been prescribed the machine you have, then it is paramount that you use it as prescribed, get results, show them to your doc (and you can share it with us if you wish). What did you learn from your sleep study? Did you have central apnea? Waiting for your posted results, if you wish to share them. If not, we can just toss search terms to you.

You have been at this a while, so check the basics - pressure is high enough to knock out obstructive apnea, low enough not to cause undue clear airway apneas, enough of the right sleep, ramp not too low, EPR or PS set higher or lower as needed, flow limitations dealt with, dealing with leaking, dealing with anxiety panic and hyperventilation, dreaming, feelings, and comfort issues.

If you think is has been studied, then do a web search for the subject, then add NIH to the end. Example: "nasal pressure apnea hiccups nih"

Good luck and hope we hear from you.

QAL
Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
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#5
(06-21-2015, 10:07 PM)Clinte89 Wrote: Well the information I'm interested in is basically how ipap and epap affect treatment how each setting on a machine can affect treatment. I'm interested in learning how everything works in something that I can just sit down and read. Learn how to figure what min vent should be or average flow rates should be and all of that. I would like to know because my machine records data and by that data I'm fine but by my sleep report it doesn't look so good from the lab so I want to know why that is and should I worry about it. I'm just tired of being old at 26 I can't do a lot of the things people my age do. I do have a very physically demanding job that is long hours but I do that work outside and can't lose weight to get any better. So I figure if I learn more I can ask more informed questions because right now I'm not sure what to ask.

When you had your sleep study (I presume that is what you mean by the report from the lab doesn't look so good) well, that is what it is untreated. If you are using your machine every time you sleep, you are now being treated. You probably have a big sleep deficit like most of us built up while we were not being treated for OSA. You won't recover 100% overnight.

What are your symptoms that you are currently experiencing? I don't understand what you mean by you can't lose weight to get any better.

There is a post here that Robysue created to explain a lot of things about flowrates, etc. but I haven't looked for it as I just read your post. I will see if I can find it and hopefully someone that knows where it is can tell you where to go and read that document. It explains a lot.

In the meantime, you can read this and see what you can find out: http://adventures-in-hosehead-land.blogspot.com/
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#6
A sleep medicine text is always an option. I have Richard Berry's "Fundamentals of Sleep Medicine" which is not the most rigorous one you can find but is still very technical and has a significant number of chapters on OSA concepts, diagnosis, treatment, treatment evaluation & effectiveness etc.
if you can't decide then you don't have enough data.
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#7
(06-22-2015, 07:06 AM)MobileBasset Wrote: A sleep medicine text is always an option. I have Richard Berry's "Fundamentals of Sleep Medicine" which is not the most rigorous one you can find but is still very technical and has a significant number of chapters on OSA concepts, diagnosis, treatment, treatment evaluation & effectiveness etc.

I may have misunderstood what the OP is asking for but I think they want to know what all the data seen means and what the norm for those are. I wish I could find robysue's post as I think it would be helpful to the OP
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#8
If your o2 average was above 90 during your sleep study, spending money on an o2 monitor is questionable and probably a waste of your money. For most people, solve the apnea and the o2 rises. I know some folks will disagree on that, mostly because more data is better if you feel the cpap isn't doing enough and you want to do more adjusting. I'll try to forward the link from Robysue, but if that doesn't work, ill post it when I get home. I can't copy and paste on a tablet.
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