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resmed s9
#1
Does anyone know the difference between the elite and vpap? Which is the top of the line model?
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#2
Hi quot;G",
If I'm not mistaken, the S9Elite is just a straight CPAP machine, and the VPAP is a bilevel machine, but hang in there and someone who knows about the total ins and outs will be able to answer your question.
trish6hundred
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#3
What's the difference between bi-level and cpap?
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#4
(06-07-2013, 01:39 PM)"G Wrote: What's the difference between bi-level and cpap?

Check it out. POST
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#5
CPAPs deliver a steady pressure of air. A setting of 8 means it is pushing hard enough to move a liter of water 8 centimeters.

A "straight" CPAP delivers 8 all the time (if that is the setting).
An "auto" CPAP delivers pressure within the set range, adjusting as needed. So if a machine is set 8-12, it will start at 8 and adjust during the night, never going above 12.
What these two have in common is their exhale relief. Both will drop the pressure on exhale (or raise it on inhale) a maximum of 3 points. So if the machine is set to 2 and the pressure is 8, the 8 is your inhale and 6 is your exhale. This makes it easier on the user.

A "variable" or "bilevel" CPAP is similar to an autoPAP in that it delivers pressure within the range setting. However, the difference is in its exhale relief. It can change the pressure to a higher amount. I think it goes to 5 or 6. This type of machine is best for those who have lung issues and/or limited lung function.

Some "variable" machines are designed for folks with either Complex Sleep Apnea or Central Sleep Apnea. Usually, however, the machine will mention something about "auto-servos" (ASV).

If you have a lung issue (such as COPD), you will most likely need the VPAP. However, if you do not have a lung issue, you don't need it.

If you are looking for a "top of the line", then you want an autoPAP such as the PRS1 Auto or the S9 Autoset. Avoid any Phillips-Respironics with the word "Plus" in the name and any Resmed with "Escape" in the name.
PaulaO2
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#6
(06-07-2013, 03:28 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: A setting of 8 means it is pushing hard enough to move a liter of water 8 centimeters.

Close, but not quite. A setting of 8 means that the pressure is the same as provided by a column of water 8 centimeters tall. The water volume does not play a part in the column pressure.

This is the same concept as how "normal" atmospheric pressure is 29.92 inches of mercury.

[ Don't you hate pedantic engineers? ]
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