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should I be worried about going over 23 cmH2O on a regular bases?
#1
should I be worried about going over 23 cmH2O on a regular bases?

does this mean the IRS guys missed there mark by saying I needed a brick only ably to go to 20 cmH2O and that if mem serves me they said I needed 12 cmH2O and they did not want to go higher as I could have some sort of problems, they seemed to think 12 high for some reason.

BTW I am assuming the units were cmH2O as we are metric up here, but you know what is said about assumptions.....LOL

the unit was a Philips Respironics unit, not sure of model, not sure if that helps any.

so any feed back on this would help, BTW I did notice air wanting to make its way to my stomach at times.
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#2
If they said you needed 12, then that's probably what the testing indicated. So I don't know why your machine is set to "blow me away." 23 is really high. I thought I was set kind of high at 15. But then everyone's different. Except me of course. I'm not different.

If you're set to a range of say 13 - 23, then the machine will test where it thinks you should be. So it might open up to 23, then chill out a little and drop to 15 or so. Maybe you should post a pic of a typical night so we can see what you're pressures are actually doing.
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#3
(04-02-2014, 12:20 PM)space45 Wrote: should I be worried about going over 23 cmH2O on a regular bases?
Maybe. Maybe not.

The question is why is the machine increasing the pressure so high, particularly when the titration study indicated a much lower pressure level was all that you needed. And to answer that question, you need to look at the data your machine records.

And there are some real potential problems with using more pressure than is needed. Most of the problems are comfort issues---with aerophagia and mask leaks both having a tendency to increase with the pressure level.

But some people have real problems with what are called pressure induced central apneas. And the higher the pressure, the more risk there is of developing pressure induced CAs. Most of the time if this is going to be a problem, it emerges almost immediately.

So another good question is: Are you able to sleep comfortably and soundly at the very high pressure levels?

Quote:the unit was a Philips Respironics unit, not sure of model, not sure if that helps any.
In order to go as high as 23, your PR unit must be one of the BiPAPs. Take the humidifier tank out of the humidifier, turn the machine over and find the model number. It will consist of some letters with a three digit number in it. What's the 3 digit number?

Quote:so any feed back on this would help, BTW I did notice air wanting to make its way to my stomach at times.
Air in the stomach may be one of the problems "they" said might happen. Aerophagia is often worse for people on very high pressures, but some of us get it at very low pressures too. How much does the air bother you and is it every painful?


Quote:BTW I am assuming the units were cmH2O as we are metric up here, but you know what is said about assumptions.....LOL
Yes, cpap pressures are measured in cmH2O even here in the US, land of the archaic measurement system.

Fact is US medicine uses metric units for the most part, except for temperature taking which is done in degrees Farenheit. Even most of our OTC meds are dosed in metric units, although in the liquid formulas like cough syrup, the manufacturers make sure the metric dose of medicine is delivered in terms of the archaic measuring teaspoon we use for measuring out the dose at home.





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#4
set range is 11 to 25, and that was raised slowly from the default based on the data from machine
not sure about the IRS guys if I was at 12 and they said higher was high and went a tad higher or if they set it to 12 and said that was high.
it sure looked like my input was all they had as they did not say anything about leaking or any other problems I was having, not sure if they used the same device they used for saying I was apnea OK with their CPAP unit as they used to say I had apnea to begin with, hard to remember every detail.

will attach PDF of report so you guys can see
well the file is to big to attach, here is a link to it
https://app.box.com/s/1wwek4g2kz1saql0simy

(04-02-2014, 12:32 PM)retired_guy Wrote: If they said you needed 12, then that's probably what the testing indicated. So I don't know why your machine is set to "blow me away." 23 is really high. I thought I was set kind of high at 15. But then everyone's different. Except me of course. I'm not different.

If you're set to a range of say 13 - 23, then the machine will test where it thinks you should be. So it might open up to 23, then chill out a little and drop to 15 or so. Maybe you should post a pic of a typical night so we can see what you're pressures are actually doing.

Post Reply Post Reply
#5
I have had no problems so far with the air going into my stomach, no pain just a tad uncomfortable.
yes mask leaking is fun but so far so good
as for central apnea I seem good, awake I have lots but when sleeping they are few and small as per my data, here is last nights charts and info

https://app.box.com/s/1wwek4g2kz1saql0simy

as you can see I awoke middle of the night by the event cluster

as for sleep, I would have told you I slept well but some nights woke up more tired then going to bed, but over all have a good sleep except for run to take a leak. I have more energy lately but not sure if that is from sleep or what, sleep all night with no bathroom run, so that is way better.

for some reason I wake with only 3 to 5 hours sleep and feel great, well rested and ready to go, thing is it will not last and get tried fast, but if I go back to sleep I have to drag my butt out of bed and I do not feel good at all, like I did not sleep, but have a longer days feeling ok, but not near as well as the shorter time when getting up the first time I wake up. in fact most time I feel better when I go to bed then when I wake up from a long nights sleep. this has been a problem for a long time and I have no idea why it happens.



(04-02-2014, 03:42 PM)robysue Wrote:
(04-02-2014, 12:20 PM)space45 Wrote: should I be worried about going over 23 cmH2O on a regular bases?
Maybe. Maybe not.

The question is why is the machine increasing the pressure so high, particularly when the titration study indicated a much lower pressure level was all that you needed. And to answer that question, you need to look at the data your machine records.

And there are some real potential problems with using more pressure than is needed. Most of the problems are comfort issues---with aerophagia and mask leaks both having a tendency to increase with the pressure level.

But some people have real problems with what are called pressure induced central apneas. And the higher the pressure, the more risk there is of developing pressure induced CAs. Most of the time if this is going to be a problem, it emerges almost immediately.

So another good question is: Are you able to sleep comfortably and soundly at the very high pressure levels?

Quote:the unit was a Philips Respironics unit, not sure of model, not sure if that helps any.
In order to go as high as 23, your PR unit must be one of the BiPAPs. Take the humidifier tank out of the humidifier, turn the machine over and find the model number. It will consist of some letters with a three digit number in it. What's the 3 digit number?

Quote:so any feed back on this would help, BTW I did notice air wanting to make its way to my stomach at times.
Air in the stomach may be one of the problems "they" said might happen. Aerophagia is often worse for people on very high pressures, but some of us get it at very low pressures too. How much does the air bother you and is it every painful?


Quote:BTW I am assuming the units were cmH2O as we are metric up here, but you know what is said about assumptions.....LOL
Yes, cpap pressures are measured in cmH2O even here in the US, land of the archaic measurement system.

Fact is US medicine uses metric units for the most part, except for temperature taking which is done in degrees Farenheit. Even most of our OTC meds are dosed in metric units, although in the liquid formulas like cough syrup, the manufacturers make sure the metric dose of medicine is delivered in terms of the archaic measuring teaspoon we use for measuring out the dose at home.

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#6
wow my S9 VPAP machine is going up to 24.8 cmH2O

getting bad AHI numbers as I can not get rig of wake time data that is messing with my numbers, it is a wonder I stay alive going by my wake time events.

should I be trying to lower my top end pressure and see if it helps any?

I am very comfortable at this high setting as far as mask goes, so that is good

I am shocked I have such high numbers, but then again with the sleep guys saying I am the worst case they have ever seen, maybe I should not be so shocked.
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