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sleep apnea and general anesthesia
#21
I think "twilight" in this context refers to morphine plus scopalamine. Propofol is probably safer, short half-life, no opiods depressing the CNS.

I had twilight about 30 years ago for wisdom teeth. I remember being partially aroused by the time they were pulling the last one out; I can still hear the sound of it detaching from my gums.

But after, I was pretty high; wanted to go party, and that is what I told my girlfriend at the desk as I was checking out of the Dr's offfice. That is, until the drugs wore off and the pain set in.
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#22
No problem here either. I told the doctor that I had sleep apnea and he did not seemed too concerned.

Brad
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#23
thank you everyone for all the encouragement. my procedure is Monday. I talked to the anesthesiologist today. he is very nice. he said he has more worry about my heart problem than my sleep apnea. so I will let you guys know how it went.
I forgot to mention: I am scheduled for my titration study on the 16th. I know I wont sleep. I cant sleep in a strange place. will they still give me a cpap machine if I don't sleep? had one many years ago but was unable to use it.
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#24
(01-29-2015, 12:50 AM)babbins1 Wrote: thank you everyone for all the encouragement. my procedure is Monday. I talked to the anesthesiologist today. he is very nice. he said he has more worry about my heart problem than my sleep apnea. so I will let you guys know how it went.
I forgot to mention: I am scheduled for my titration study on the 16th. I know I wont sleep. I cant sleep in a strange place. will they still give me a cpap machine if I don't sleep? had one many years ago but was unable to use it.

if you're worried the other post that we were talking about the member that had the sleep study last night it will give you some hints and suggestions and if push comes to shove take a sleep aid with you you could try somnapure that is supposed to be natural and I've heard a lot of people really liked it and I'm sure some other members here will have other suggestions for you if you can't find that other post let us know and I'll go look for it
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#25
I feel somewhat better after reading these comments and the other threads about General Anesthesia. I have OSA, diagnosed in December 2013 although I know I had it for several years prior. I sleep with a ResMed S9 set at 12 and hooked up to an oxygen concentrator set at 4 liters because even though I sleep with a CPap I still breathe too shallow when i sleep so therefore the O2.

I am scheduled for a surgical procedure on 3/18/15. In and out same day pretty minor surgery. My doctor (surgeon) said I will be going under general anesthesia. It didn't hit me that I had not told her that I have OSA so I sent her a note. Also had to have surgery clearance from my regular doctor because of diabetes and hypothyroidism. She cleared me for those two is sending me to see a pulmonologist tomorrow inorder to be cleared for surgery because of my OSA.

Google can be good or it can be bad, and it has alot of scary info about general anesthesia with OSA so I have been scared, but reading all your comments have helped.
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#26
Lyn1959:

Please see my comments in this thread: http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...-endoscopy.

The major issue is narcotic-induced respiratory depression postop. Coupled with sleep apnea, the results can be disastrous. Most institutions require 3-hours of postoperative observation prior to considering discharge, some require an overnight stay and monitoring.

The pulmonologist should opine on whether or not on are in optimal condition from a pulmonary viewpoint for general anesthesia. He/she cannot "clear" you for anesthesia. Only an anesthesia provider can make that decision after reviewing the opinions of your other physicians. We are clinical pharmacologists and, as such, have the best judgement regarding the interactions of your anatomy/physiology with the pharmacology of anesthetic agents and opioid pain relievers. Do not be as far as I know, you will be in good hands with a skilled, knowledgable anesthesia provider. Good luck.
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#27
Thank you Aether087. I understand what you said about my other doctors not being able to clear me or anesthesia, I misspoke (I knew what I meant lol) Anyways, thanks for the info. Your link that you posted did not work though. It says page not found. Smile
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#28
Hi Lyn, my post below:

Post: #4RE: Using CPAP after endoscopy
When anesthesia for upper endoscopies and colonoscopies is directed/administered by the gastroenterologist, the anesthesia type is "moderate-sedation." This is usually a combination of midazolam (high-test Valium) and fentanyl (synthetic opioid many times more potent than morphine). The amounts used are usually small (less than 5 mg midazolam and less than 200 mcg fentanyl) BUT both of these drugs depress the bodies response to arterial CO2 and thus depress respiration. This respiratory depression can last for up to 24 hours and can exacerbate sleep apnea. Patients who receive midazolam and/or fentanyl should definitely be monitored for at least 3 hours and have their machine with them.

When anesthesia for 'scopes is administered by an anesthesiologist, the anesthesia type is "monitored anesthesia care (MAC). The drug used is almost exclusively propofol (killed Michael Jackson) and results in a deeper level of anesthesia than does moderate sedation. The advantage to propofol is that it is very easy for skilled personnel to titrate the med to the patient's needs and propofol is quickly cleared from the body after administration is stopped. Clinically significant respiratory depression rarely persists for less than 10 minutes and most patients are discharged in about 30 minutes. It is not necessary for patients to have their xPAP with them for MAC anesthesia. I had an inguinal hernia repair done this AM with local anesthesia and MAC sedation. Was awake in the OR at end of case and discharged home in less than 30 minutes.

I will use my APAP for bed tonight.
(This post was last modified: Yesterday 04:34 PM by Aether087.)
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