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steam inhaler
#1
Does any one have experience with using a steam inhaler. I have life long asthma, allergies, bronchitis and of course sleep apnea. I cant see that it would hurt and maybe some benefits.

Thanks, car54
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#2
Many CPAPs provide a water reservoir to provide humidity when using the machine; it may be possible to adjust the water temp. Some also have heated tubes to keep the tube from condensing moisture.
Check the manual for your machine - if you haven't got one yet, look at the top of the page for Setup Manuals.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#3
I used one for years, they work very well for clearing congestion in the upper respiratory trac. I quit using it after I went on APAP. I prefer to heat the water in my humidifier in the microwave for 3 minutes. The hot water creates  steam in the hose for a few minutes  and then the hose cools down to the set temperature of my heated hose.  I use a heated hose set at 86 F.

Be careful not to heat you water above 109 F. Which is the maximum recommended temperature by  Underwriters Laboratories for a steam inhaler. High temperature can burn you! Too much heat will also age components of your hose, mask, and cushion. Sleep-well
2004-Bon Jovi
it'll take more than a doctor to prescribe a remedy

Observations and recommendations communicated here are the perceptions of the writer and should not be misconstrued as medical advice.
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#4
I do use the humidifier and heated hose. I am prone to upper respiratory infections. Just getting over one now, 103 degree fever and lung very congested with mucous. I am in constant contact with wood dust at work. Because of life long asthma and allergies my lung capacity is nearly 50% of what it should be. I thought a steamer would loosen things up and make it easier to cough all of the junk out of my lungs. I did order one for $30.00. Not much to lose.

Car54
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#5
Car 54, I don't think it would hurt either.  At the least it will give you soft skin. Smile

Just to play safe though, it wouldn't hurt to check with your doctor since you have lung issues.
OpalRose
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#6
(03-10-2017, 06:22 AM)car54 Wrote: I do use the humidifier and heated hose. I am prone to upper respiratory infections. Just getting over one now, 103 degree fever and lung very congested with mucous. I am in constant contact with wood dust at work. Because of life long asthma and allergies my lung capacity is nearly 50% of what it should be. I thought a steamer would loosen things up and make it easier to cough all of the junk out of my lungs. I did order one for $30.00. Not much to lose.

Car54

Do you wear a respirator, or at least a dust mask, at work?
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#7
Sometimes. We are moving to a new building in 6 months and the air system is supposed to be engineered so the air quality should be better. I am lacking at using a mask but I am getting better at it.

car54
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#8
You get 1 set of lungs and they aren't designed to handle frequent heavy loads of particulate. 

Excess particulate can stay in the lungs for quite sometime after stopping the exposures (ex tobacco smoke can take a good year to clear, if I recall correctly). Sometimes particulate may generate other conditions (ex asbestos -> asbestosis and lung scarring).

If you have to do so, get your own respirator to protect your lungs. Put a reminder where it will prompt you to wear it.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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