Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
#1
what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
on or off CPAP.

does a basal SPO2 of 92 seem low for overnight? (not on CPAP)
Post Reply Post Reply



Donate to Apnea Board  
#2
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
If your levels drop below 88% for any length of time, that could be a cause for concern.

If you are trying to decide if you have sleep apnea based on an overnight oximeter, you may want to talk to your doctor about an in lab test or an overnight home test, which would be a cheaper option.
OpalRose
Apnea Board Administrator
www.ApneaBoard.com
Dreaming


https://www.sleepfiles.com/OSCAR
http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ganization
Using Attachments to Post ScreenShots.
Mask Primer
Machine Choices



INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE.  ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA.  INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
my SPO2 does go below 88 but not for long enough i think. only happens 2-3 times a night for a short while, not sure if that is enough to disturb my sleep and cause fatigue or that is normal. i think it is for about an accumulative minute it goes under 88%.

but someone said 92 basal/baseline was low overall.
Post Reply Post Reply
#4
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
I believe that a 92 reading during wake hours is considered a bit low. My doctor (Pulmonologist) normally looks at wake time readings to be normal if above 94.

If you are tracking this with an overnight recording oximeter and also taking readings during the day, it wouldn’t hurt to gather this information for your doctor to review.
OpalRose
Apnea Board Administrator
www.ApneaBoard.com
Dreaming


https://www.sleepfiles.com/OSCAR
http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ganization
Using Attachments to Post ScreenShots.
Mask Primer
Machine Choices



INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE.  ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA.  INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply



Donate to Apnea Board  
#5
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
As best as I recall, the 88% mentioned has to be documented for 5 minutes during the test duration. That equals medical necessity for supplemental oxygen from what I know.

As for 92%, this February July I fought a bout of pneumonia and had the 92% oxygen level. Besides pneumonia complications, by itself the lower oxygen level gave me an "oxygen deprived headache" and created feelings of dizziness, lightheadedness maybe. I felt the deprived status.
Dave

I'm not a doctor in real or fictional life. My posts include opinions based upon user experience regarding CPAP therapy and should not be considered medically professional direction or advice.


Wiki Info for Beginners
OSCAR Chart Organization
Mask Primer
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
During sleep, O2 can range from 90 on up and still be 'good'. However, 92 seems to be the norm low.

It is when it gets into the 80s during sleep that one should become concerned. And, like OpalRose said, discuss this with your doctor.

Daytime O2 should remain at 94 and up.

However, these numbers greatly depend on the individual. Folks with asthma may need to lower their baseline/norm. COPD, allergies, etc also contribute. And some folks don't have many O2 drops during sleep with untreated sleep apnea. Some folks, it drops immediately as soon as an event happens. Others, it seems to be accumulative with recovery back to sleep-normal being slower and drops going lower. Even more others, it just doesn't drop that much overall. That's why the range for "norm" is fairly loose.
PaulaO

Take a deep breath and count to zen.




Post Reply Post Reply
#7
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
(11-05-2019, 08:44 AM)crave303 Wrote: my SPO2 does go below 88 but not for long enough i think. only happens 2-3 times a night for a short while, not sure if that is enough to disturb my sleep and cause fatigue or that is normal. i think it is for about an accumulative minute it goes under 88%.

but someone said 92 basal/baseline was low overall.

SPO2 below 90 for any length of time is a cause for concern.  It might turn out to be nothing worth pursuing, but if a person awake can expect to be oxygenated at 94% or higher, why would a person at rest experience periodic dips below 90?  And how would that be 'normal'?  It would be worth finding out, don't you think?

You provide some information, but it isn't complete or definitive. You say, '..not for long enough I think.'  How long?  Is it too long?  How far below 88 does it ever go, at what frequency, and at what duration?

I'm not ragging on you.  I'm being inquisitive hoping that you would eventually want to ask such questions for your own sake.  They're important, and they deserve more information than you can bring to the discussion.

Finally, any time you go short of oxygen for a certain length of time, you run the risk of several things happening, not least of which are developing heart disease, an irritated heart, arrhythmias, arousals, a dearth of the oh-so-necessary REM sleep, and other undesirable outcomes. A reliable and persistent shortage night-to-night can't be salutary in the long run.  If your health begins to slide, it won't be uphill.  As it slides, other unwanted and unfortunate things will take place and very likely make things in your sleep go even worse for you.  You should really tackle this sensibly and soon.  And realistically, with some hard and valid data.
Post Reply Post Reply



Donate to Apnea Board  
#8
RE: what is your overnight SPO2 baseline?
(11-07-2019, 09:51 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: Daytime O2 should remain at 94 and up.

However, these numbers greatly depend on the individual. Folks with asthma may need to lower their baseline/norm. COPD, allergies, etc also contribute. And some folks don't have many O2 drops during sleep with untreated sleep apnea. Some folks, it drops immediately as soon as an event happens. Others, it seems to be accumulative with recovery back to sleep-normal being slower and drops going lower. Even more others, it just doesn't drop that much overall. That's why the range for "norm" is fairly loose. 


Totally agree with everything Paula is saying here.  

We have 20-30 year olds, a whole mess of boomers, folks that are 80s, and then probably really senior folks.  

92% is horrible for a 35 year who until now thought they were in good health.  If your a 105 92% is downright awesome!   

What is normal is hard to define for the whole population that read this forum.   I think it might be easier to assess, plan, take action on and monitor progress if we look with these four dimensions:
  1. Age - Cant do anything about that
  2. Health - Most still have some influence here, easier to impact if you start earlier
  3. Fitness - Nearly all of us can turn this dial to improve daytime and night time SpO2 & Heart Rate
  4. Therapy - Improving therapy is what brought most people here to this great group.  
 

"What is normal for someone my age, health, level of fitness and utilizing this therapy?   What realistic practical things should I do next to improve my level of fitness or my therapy?"   
 
These are powerful question to ask.   
 
I continually ask myself these questions and position forth as an encouragement to all of us this quote from mesenteria.   "I'm being inquisitive hoping that you would eventually want to ask such questions for your own sake.  They're important, and they deserve more information than you can bring to the discussion." 
 

WillSleep

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  What is SpO2 Drop Index' cmcphee 1 168 10-02-2019, 10:12 PM
Last Post: srlevine1
  Best current medical paper tape for overnight mouth taping Marillion 16 1,034 08-19-2019, 09:50 AM
Last Post: yrnkrn
  SpO2 drop without any apnea? MyronH 16 919 08-06-2019, 09:26 AM
Last Post: MyronH
  Contec SpO2 meter went crazy MyronH 6 433 07-05-2019, 10:10 AM
Last Post: MyronH
  AHI or SPO2 drgrimes 24 1,877 06-27-2019, 08:04 AM
Last Post: drgrimes
  Is it normal to drop below 88%? (can anyone interpret this SPO2 report?) crave303 5 561 06-12-2019, 09:32 AM
Last Post: bonjour
  SpO2 decreases when lying down - feeling of getting not enough air MyronH 4 350 05-18-2019, 05:06 PM
Last Post: Matt00926


New Posts   Today's Posts






About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.