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Due to needing to educate a family member (Who insists that CPAP/APAP is a last resort after all other options are exhausted!), I've put together a glossary of terms. Maybe some newbies may find this useful. 

Sleep Apnea Glossary of Terms
 
AHI – Average Hypopnea Index - an index used to indicate the severity of sleep apnea, 0-5 is normal, 5-10 is mild, 10-20 is moderate, above 30 is severe. This is a measure of the average number of Apneas or hypopeas recorded per hour of sleep. This can also be called average events per hour. An AHI of 15, would therefore mean that a person stops breathing for more than 10 seconds on average 15 times per hour in their sleep.

Apnea (Sometimes Aponea) - A cessation of breathing A cessation of breathing. When apnea occurs during sleep due to an obstruction of the airways despite efforts to breathe—akin to an extreme form of snoring—it is called “obstructive sleep apnea.” If apnea occurs because there is no attempt to breath during sleep, this is called “central sleep apnea.”

CPAP or APAP – Continuous/Automatic Positive Airway Pressure – Specialised air pump which forces air down the UA by way of a mask or nasal apparatus so as to prevent apnea events.

CA/CSA – Central (Sleep) Apnea ­– In this case, the airway is actually open, but the brain doesn’t send a signal to the body to breathe. (Most people can also have mixed apneas, or a mixture of OSA and CSA related events throughout the night.)

EPR – Expiratory Pressure Relief – Comfort feature which reduces pressure on a CPAP/APAP machine on exhalation

Hypopnea – Shallow or abnormally low respiratory rate

Hypoventillation – A state in which a reduced amount of air enters the lungs

OSA – Obstructive Sleep Apnea – when the airway closes due to soft tissue falling with gravity for a period greater than 10 seconds causing lack of oxygen to the lungs and difficulty breathing.

OA (oral appliances) or MAD (Mandibular Advancement Device) – A “Mouthguard” like device made by a dentist or prosthadontist which pulls the jaw forward and forces the soft tissue of the UA open.

RERA - Respiratory Effort Related Arousal – Although symptoms can be similar between RERA and OSA, there are quite a number of differences. With RERA, these events are usually one to three breaths in length and can last 10 seconds or longer. In OSA, stoppage of breathing can occur anywhere from 5 times to over 30 an hour and can last as long as a minute.

UA – Upper Airway – Components of the biology of the airway which include the nose, mouth, tongue, trachea, larynx and pharynx


UARS – Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome – Narrowing of airway which can cause disruptions in sleep (RERA)
Nice work Kelijan. Have you seen the glossary in our wiki? It might be interesting to compare some of the definitions: http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...efinitions
Still, handy for new users   Wink
(12-07-2017, 03:14 AM)Keljian Wrote: [ -> ]AHI – Average Hypopnea Index - an index used to indicate the severity of sleep apnea, 0-5 is normal, 5-10 is mild, 10-20 is moderate, above 30 is severe.

The cut-off between mild and moderate is 15, not 10. And anything at or above that, but below 30, is moderate.
(12-07-2017, 06:30 AM)Sleepster Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-07-2017, 03:14 AM)Keljian Wrote: [ -> ]AHI – Average Hypopnea Index - an index used to indicate the severity of sleep apnea, 0-5 is normal, 5-10 is mild, 10-20 is moderate, above 30 is severe.

The cut-off between mild and moderate is 15, not 10. And anything at or above that, but below 30, is moderate.

I’ve read conflicting reports on that. Frankly if you’re 10 or above on a regular basis you need therapy, and quick, in my opinion.
(12-07-2017, 06:34 AM)Keljian Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-07-2017, 06:30 AM)Sleepster Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-07-2017, 03:14 AM)Keljian Wrote: [ -> ]AHI – Average Hypopnea Index - an index used to indicate the severity of sleep apnea, 0-5 is normal, 5-10 is mild, 10-20 is moderate, above 30 is severe.

The cut-off between mild and moderate is 15, not 10. And anything at or above that, but below 30, is moderate.

I’ve read conflicting reports on that. Frankly if you’re 10 or above on a regular basis you need therapy, and quick, in my opinion.

Keljian,
Thanks for compiling the glossary.  Your family member is lucky to have you.  
Although, sometimes family members are the hardest to convince that they need Cpap therapy.

The information below is from the Wiki and is what the medical profession uses.

AHI Rating
<5 Normal (no Sleep Apnea)
5-15 Mild Sleep Apnea
15-30 Moderate Sleep Apnea
>30 Severe Sleep Apnea

The Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) is used as a measure of the severity of the condition known as sleep apnea. The AHI is the sum of the number of apneas (pauses in breathing) plus the number of hypopneas (periods of shallow breathing) that occur, on average, each hour. To count in the index apneas and hypopneas, collectively called events, must have a duration of at least 10 seconds.

The AHI, as with the separate Apnea Index and Hypopnea Index, is calculated by dividing the number of events by the number of hours of sleep.
Quick note of thanks for the wiki - a google search led me there, along with forum threads that helped me learn about my symptoms. In an environment where health care providers toss you the life preserver without instructions on how to use it, this information is invaluable.

I'm still a novice on grasping the terms, their significance, and their interrelationships, but via the resources here I've learned more in the past two weeks than I did the prior nine months. Thanks again!
OpalRose : the issue is convincing the family member that I need therapy unfortunately. But that is another story.
(12-07-2017, 03:48 PM)Keljian Wrote: [ -> ]OpalRose : the issue is convincing the family member that I need therapy unfortunately. But that is another story.

Ah, well I got that backwards from reading your post.  

Most folk who haven’t been exposed to anyone with a sleep disorder will have a hard time understanding.
I went many years not knowing what Sleep Apnea was, as I never heard anyone discuss it. Dont-know

Try having your family member watch this video. “Understanding Sleep Disordered Breathing.”
Click on Wiki at top of page and scroll to bottom for video.

Good Luck!