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Hi, first time poster.  I am diagnosed with mild OSA with an AHI of 6 and I am scheduled to get my CPAP next week and will have a RT go over everything.  I was looking over my home and office sleep studies and I was curious about oxygen levels.

My home study had my O2 dropping to 81%. In the office study, I was placed on a CPAP at 5cm from the beginning and stopped at 8 when my AHI reached 2.2. However, my Mean O2 during my office study was about 91 for each setting and my minimums were at 85-86.  

The prescribed pressure for my CPAP will be 8 and this was determined based off the lowering of my AHI to 2.2, but aren't my O2 levels still low?
There are 2 aspects of O2 desaturations, 1st is level, how low?. The 2nd is duration. Post your sleep studies and we can, and will, give you a better answer.

You want to get a full data capable machine, one which records full efficacy (treatment) data. You also want to get an Auto CPAP. It is much more capable and flexible.

Read the new to CPAP link in my signature.

Fred
Hi MoApnea,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Hang in there for more responses to your post.
Good luck as you start CPAP therapy.
Hi MoApnea,
Yes, it looks like your SpO2 levels are kind of low, but not alarmingly  low. I don't think your mild apnea can account for the low base level.
When I was diagnosed last year with an AHI of 19, I was told that my moderate sleep apnea did not account for my low oxygen.
On APAP my base level improved a small amount, and most of the dips were removed.
It took a couple of months for my oxygen level to improve significantly.
In that time I lost 30 lbs and address my GERD seriously.
I guess it would depends on the length of time under 90%. Titration normally has the minimum O2 to be above 90%. If that can't be achieved on cpap, then bipap/bilevel is used and sometimes O2 supplemented if needed.
https://www.scribd.com/document/35340282...-Titration
You might want to pickup a oximeter and check your O2 levels during the daytime to see what level their at. They only cost $12 to $13 online or at Walmart.
(01-12-2018, 10:09 PM)Walla Walla Wrote: [ -> ]You might want to pickup a oximeter and check your O2 levels during the daytime to see what level their at. They only cost $12 to $13 online or at Walmart.

Thanks.  I went ahead and ordered one just to see what my numbers are during the day.  If I want to know what my O2 is doing during the night, any recommendation on type of product I'm looking for?
(01-12-2018, 09:48 PM)Mogy Wrote: [ -> ]It took a couple of months for my oxygen level to improve significantly.
In that time I lost 30 lbs and address my GERD seriously.

It's interesting that you mention GERD.  I'm not diagnosed with it, but I do have bouts of it from time to time.  Mostly I link it to excessive energy drink/soda intake.  I've had a longer bout of it lately and I started up on prilosec for a few weeks and it's resolving pretty good.

One issue I do have is that I eat a lot right before bed.. almost every night.  It's a side effect I have from Ambien (I've been on Ambien 5+ years but I am looking to get off once I address my OSA).  I will eat between 500 to 1000 calories of various foods and then go up to bed and be lying down like 10 minutes later.  I know that is horrible for acid reflux, among other things.  How impactful do you think that eating is on my OSA?
I want to second Bonjour's recommendation you get an Auto CPAP that is fully data capable, and will go further and say the Resmed Airsense 10 Autoset would be the best choice. I find it surprising that the titration study settled on a 2.2 AHI on a patient with mild apnea. It's not much improvement, and I think you could do better; and will if you get the right machine.

It may take some time, but be sure to get copies of your sleep studies for your records as they can satisfy the requirement for sleep tests for a lifetime. Ahead of getting a prescription and referral to a DME supplier, you should contact your insurance carrier and ask for a list of DME CPAP suppliers that are in-network for your area. It's a good idea to contact them and ask if they will dispense the machine you want (Airsense 10 Autoset) with a CPAP prescription of 8. Some of them provide good machines, and others give you the cheapest piece of crap they can. Asking first can help you find the ones that routinely issue auto-CPAP machines. Also ask insurance what their policy is on purchase or rental of a CPAP. Most will require a brief rental period, but the policy varies. If your insurance typically authorizes purchase, don't let a DME attempt to stick you with a 13 month rental.
(01-15-2018, 02:53 PM)MoApnea Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-12-2018, 09:48 PM)Mogy Wrote: [ -> ]It took a couple of months for my oxygen level to improve significantly.
In that time I lost 30 lbs and address my GERD seriously.

It's interesting that you mention GERD.  I'm not diagnosed with it, but I do have bouts of it from time to time.  Mostly I link it to excessive energy drink/soda intake.  I've had a longer bout of it lately and I started up on prilosec for a few weeks and it's resolving pretty good.

One issue I do have is that I eat a lot right before bed.. almost every night.  It's a side effect I have from Ambien (I've been on Ambien 5+ years but I am looking to get off once I address my OSA).  I will eat between 500 to 1000 calories of various foods and then go up to bed and be lying down like 10 minutes later.  I know that is horrible for acid reflux, among other things.  How impactful do you think that eating is on my OSA?
They say that there is a relationship between OSA And GERD. When one gets worse the other gets worse. When one gets better the other will as well.
Here is a link to the effect of GERD on SpO2.
http://www.academia.edu/13665673/Associa...e_Oximetry
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