Apnea Board Forum - CPAP | Sleep Apnea
New to CPAP - Printable Version

+- Apnea Board Forum - CPAP | Sleep Apnea (http://www.apneaboard.com/forums)
+-- Forum: Public Area (http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Forum-Public-Area)
+--- Forum: Main Apnea Board Forum (http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Forum-Main-Apnea-Board-Forum)
+--- Thread: New to CPAP (/Thread-New-to-CPAP--26206)



New to CPAP - Aamcotrans - 08-23-2019

I am confused by the numbers of my in home test I have recently taken.
Can anyone offer me insight to it?


RE: New to CPAP - Gideon - 08-23-2019

Welcome to the forum,  like many of us you have severe sleep apnea.  46.7 AHI
This breaks down to
Apnea (80 to 100% reduction in airflow/breathing for periods greater than or equal to 10 seconds) 27 (count)  6.2 (times per hour)
Obstructive Apnea 10 (count)
Central Apnea 15 (count)
Mixed Apnea 2 (shows traits of both Obstructive and Central)
Hypopnea  (50 to 80% reduction in airflow/breathing for periods greater than or equal to 10 seconds) 40.6 (times per hour)

Hypopnea can be of either obstructive or central in nature but this distinction is not made in this report.  Very likely a good proportion of your hypopneas are central in nature.  

You also had significant Oxygen desats not quite to the point of requiring oxygen supplementation while sleeping.

A reference is made to a Head, Ears, Eyes, Nose, and Throat exam and the end result is NOT to treat with CPAP or APAP.  No statement is made on how to treat.

I would consider an advanced form of CPAP called ASV/Adaptive Servo Ventilation because of the portion of your apnea that is Central in nature.

I would have expected to at least see a recommendation for a trial use of a ResMed Autoset "APAP" machine the recognized AHI of the central component is low and see if this basic unit would control the remainder of your apnea.

Do you have any other medical conditions such as Heart, lung, throat, nose, or pain where drugs are used to control it?


RE: New to CPAP - Aamcotrans - 08-23-2019

The chart only shows 1 central event on the top portion.
I have no medical conditions, other than high BP, which is co trolled with 20 mg of lisinopril, no daytime effects of sleep apnea. 
However, I require a DOT physical and my employer requires I use a CPAP.
The dr’s office states they used the wrong recommendation template, and that I do require CPAP.
I have an appt with my local sleep doctor to review the results, yet I find it difficult that I require the use of the machine as I have zero daytime effects.


RE: New to CPAP - alexp - 08-23-2019

(08-23-2019, 01:48 PM)Aamcotrans Wrote: The chart only shows 1 central event on the top portion.
I have no medical conditions, other than high BP, which is co trolled with 20 mg of lisinopril, no daytime effects of sleep apnea. 
However, I require a DOT physical and my employer requires I use a CPAP.
The dr’s office states they used the wrong recommendation template, and that I do require CPAP.
I have an appt with my local sleep doctor to review the results, yet I find it difficult that I require the use of the machine as I have zero daytime effects.

Your sleep apnea is certainly contributing to your high BP if not causing it.


RE: New to CPAP - Gideon - 08-23-2019

Think of it as getting nudged in the ribs every 75 to 80 seconds. That is, on average, the length of your naps all night long.


RE: New to CPAP - mesenteria - 08-23-2019

Also, you sleep on your back (supine) well over 50% of your sleeping time.  This happens with most of us for at least some part of each night, often towards the last hour or two of sleep.  However, many turn from their sides onto their backs very shortly after they fall asleep.  Sleeping supine raises the risk of obstructive apnea tremendously.  For many, the muscles in the throat lose tone sufficiently, or the tongue sags backwards, that we close off our own airways...obstructive apnea.  But it can also be the case that we sag against the pillow that keeps our heads up, resulting in a tucked chin.  This is one of the principle causes of obstructive apnea.  

So, we coach people to train themselves to sleep more often on their sides, and to figure out a way to keep themselves from rolling onto their backs.  If chin tuck happens even on our sides, and it does at times, then you need a soft foam cervical collar as a first line of defence. They can be had on-line or at pharmacies everywhere, medical supply stores, and so on for maybe $20, depending on supplier and quality.