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Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Printable Version

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Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Johnnyde94 - 10-30-2020

Hello, I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for a backup battery for a Resmed Aircuve Bipap that would be running on nearly max pressure and humidity/heated tubes. I would rather not compromise my comfort as my bipap has been critical in keeping my current job and in a perfect world it would be a solution that could run as a failsafe battery so it would kick in automatically. Right now I'm leaning towards a dual battery config of the freedom cpap battery with the 24v converter. That would give me approx 200Wh and would be a more traditional cpap battery that has a passthrough but would cost nearly 500 all said and done. 

The other option I am looking at is the BALDR portable power station. It maxes out at 330 Watts and has nearly 300Wh of battery. It says it has an AC sine wave generator built in but would still require a DC converter to function. This option would be much cheaper at around 250 dollars for much more Wh. My only question with that battery would be if it could support 24Volts. 

Thrid option that seems to have high reviews is the jackery portable power station. It does a full 500 Watts and has a massive 500Wh capacity. 

Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions?


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Sleeprider - 10-30-2020

Johnny, another member has thread on this subject going on now http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-Facing-a-Power-Outage-what-can-I-buy-to-power-my-machine

The important thing is to keep any battery power in DC rather than use an AC inverter to convert the battery 12-volt DC to 120 Volt AC, then use your AC adapter for the Vauto to convert back to DC at 24 volts. Instead, buy the "KFD Car Charger DC Adapter for Resmed S10 Series,ResMed Airsense 10 Air Sense S10 AirCurve 10 Series CPAP and BiPAP Machines,90W" adapter on Amazon for $33. This will directly up-convert any 12 volt DC battery to the 24 volt DC needed by your Resmed. The use of a DC inverter to plug in your ac adapter is inherently very inefficient.

The battery itself can be any deep-cycle marine batter in a case enclosure (about $8.00 at Walmart), or you can get fancy and buy a battery enclosed in a case that has all sorts of outlets like USB, 12-volt DC and the AC inverter. It's really all about how portable you need and the watt-hours or amp-hours capacity. Just minimize the voltage conversions to maximize efficiency.


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Johnnyde94 - 10-30-2020

Thanks!


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Sleeprider - 10-30-2020

Johnny how portable do you want? You can buy deep cycle batteries rated over 60 amp-hours (720 watt-hours), and have almost endless capacity for days. For example, you could buy a Group 24 Duracell Marine battery at BatteriesPlus for $90 that is rated at 74 amp-hours, which yields 888 watt hours of power. Remember we don't really want to cycle a battery to less than 50% of its capacity. That still gives you 4X more durability and power than the 200 watt-hours you mentioned in your first post. Add a safety cover, and Resmed adapter and you're done for $135.


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Johnnyde94 - 11-01-2020

How would that be set up? Would I need jumper cables that connect to a dc converter? Portability is not really an issue as long as it’s safe I’m ok with it. I saw a 297Wh battery for 300 from MaxOak that was mentioned in a previous thread. How would capacity compare to that. Final how would I recharge the battery with a jumper pack?


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Sleeprider - 11-01-2020

Well, the heavy marine batteries are have at least twice the capacity of the Maxoak, but they are clearly not as portable. You don't need jumper cables. You need the
search KFD Car Charger DC Adapter for Resmed S10 Series on Amazon, and
search "NOCO GC017 12-Volt Adapter Plug Socket With Battery Clamps " on Amazon, and you will find one for $9.94 with clamps for the battery, and inline fuse for safety, and a lighter adapter. Another option is the "NOCO GC018 12-Volt Adapter Plug Socket With Eyelet Battery Terminals" which uses screw-on battery terminals instead of clamps. for $6.96.


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Hydrangea - 11-01-2020

If I were worried about periodically losing power while sleeping, I would not use the Jackery. From my research, the Jackery can't be used as the failsafe/pass-through type of backup.


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Johnnyde94 - 11-01-2020

It would be more for let’s say snow storms and the power is out for a day. We do occasionally get brownouts but we haven’t gotten them in a while. I wonder if the aircurve will turn back on and give pressure after a power outage or if it will only turn back on and I would have to get up and turn it back on.

What pass though I options would you guys recommend? I did a kill-a-watt test last night and by machine on full functionality used up .63 KWh so .7KWh would probably be the smallest I would buy.


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - happydreams - 11-01-2020

There are multiple ways to do it. But, you could do it with a jumper cable that has alligator clamps on one end (for the battery posts) and a cigarette lighter socket on the other. That way you could directly plug in the KFD module into the jumper cable.

As for charging, one would need a charger that can not only charge, but trickle or float. These kind of chargers can be left plugged in permanently. If you get a gel or AGM type battery (the kind that are sealed and safer) you need a charger that says it is compatible with gel and AGM batteries. An ordinary normal charger (wet cell lead acid) will ruin a gel or AGM battery.

A lead acid battery is both heavy and relatively cheap. The MaxOAK is 297WH, for $300. The battery Sleeprider suggested is 888WH, or three times greater capacity and $90. All things being the same, it should last at least 2 times longer, (between charges) and it costs less. The marine battery is much heavier, roughly around 46 lbs., but costs less than half the MaxOAK. The MaxOAK uses lithium batteries so it is much, much lighter, if I recall correctly, less than 5 lbs.

It all boils down to how long do want the battery to run for, how much should it weigh or how portable does it need to be, does it require assembly, (or complexity of assembly) and how much do you want to spend. One can put together a lower cost backup solution the way Sleeprider recommended. Which way to go depends strongly what your needs are.


RE: Backup Battery Recommendation for High Pressure and Humidity - Sleeprider - 11-01-2020

You do need to get one with an in-line fuse for safety.

NOCO GC017 12-Volt Adapter Plug Socket With Battery Clamps


[Image: 81ts6uqAhgL._AC_SS350_.jpg]
NOCO GC018 12-Volt Adapter Plug Socket With Eyelet Battery Terminals
[Image: 81-pJWS7CaL._AC_SS350_.jpg]